Sunday, 1 March 2015

A Functional {Intentional} Wardrobe


In previous posts, I make references to a functional wardrobe but I never really stated what I mean. I think it's time to change that.


I consider my wardrobe to be functional when it works well for me - my life demands, my personal style and even my body shape. A real test of this kind of functionality is time-pressure. If I can put together an outfit I love, early in the morning, with minimal fuss, then my wardrobe is working for me.

My functional wardrobe is one that has been put together over time, and {mostly} with purpose. This intentional, slow-paced approach gives me an opportunity to explore my style in a way that is adaptable and can evolve with me. It has also helped me curb impulse-buying, minimize clutter and waste in my life, and think more creatively about my outfit options.



From my experience, I wouldn't say that a functional wardrobe has to be built from scratch or that the first step towards creating functionality is to get rid of everything you don't love or need.

You need time to learn about your style and needs. As you take your time, you'll find that slowly, the garments that you really need but are probably of lower quality, are replaced with better quality ones (which last longer and need replacement less often).

As for the stuff that really has no place in your life, you either find a new home for it, or simply don't replace it at all when it reaches the end of its (generally short) life.

In time, you'll find that your wardrobe no longer overflows with unwanted possessions and, instead, reaches an optimal size that is a more honest reflection of your clothing needs.

In my definition, a functional wardrobe really is an intentional wardrobe, as I don't think you can achieve a high level of functionality without intention. functional wardrobe is put together in a mindful way.

There is some effort in putting time aside to think honestly about lifestyle demands, personal style and whether a purchase fits a real purpose.

But, if you ask me, effortless outfit options, greater opportunities to create and express your own style, and a more positive impact of your style choices, are worth this on-going, long-term process. If for nothing else, for the feeling of confidence you get when you step outside wearing something you love.


What do you think, is an intentional wardrobe something worth pursuing? If you've tried something like this yourself, what do you think have been the biggest benefits and challenges? 

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